Sen. Bernie Sanders Leaves Hospital; Doctors Confirm He Had Heart Attack

SATURDAY, Oct. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Senator Bernie Sanders left a Las Vegas hospital on Friday after being admitted with chest pains on Tuesday; his presidential campaign is now saying the 78-year-old suffered a heart attack.

Sanders experienced chest pain at a campaign event and received two stents to open a blocked artery. He has cancelled public events for the time being, The New York Times reported.

Sanders waved to onlookers and gave a fist pump as he left Desert Springs Hospital Medical Center and was taken away in a waiting vehicle. Later, after dropping off bags at his hotel, he was seen taking a walk in a nearby park with his wife, Jane.

“After two and a half days in the hospital, I feel great, and after taking a short time off, I look forward to getting back to work,” Sanders said in a statement.

His doctors in Las Vegas, Arturo Marchand and Arjun Gururaj, said the senator’s “hospital course was uneventful with good expected progress,” the Times added.

Although his campaign is not saying when he will resume a normal schedule, on Thursday it was announced that Sanders does plan to take part in the next Democratic debate, scheduled for Oct. 15 near Columbus, Ohio.

Dr. Steven Nissen, a cardiologist and chief academic officer at Cleveland Clinic’s Heart & Vascular Institute, said that stenting should allow Sanders to resume normal activities.

“We don’t know all the details, but this is a common, safe procedure, and with contemporary stents, it generally comes with a short recovery time,” said Nissen, who wasn’t involved in Sanders’ care. “The purpose of modern medicine is to let people continue pursuing their passions, and for this procedure, patients can generally get back to that relatively quickly.”

Dr. Satjit Bhusri, a cardiologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, said Sanders suffered the classic signs of heart attack and was promptly sent to emergency services.

“All heart attacks present differently. In women, for example, they typically present as a sudden shortness of breath. Mr. Sanders had the textbook symptoms of chest pain that was successfully treated,” Bhusri noted.